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NCUC Rules on Duke Energy Solar Rebates Program: Takeaways for the Clean Energy Community

Solar energy is a driving force behind North Carolina’s growing clean energy economy, which has advanced tremendously in the past decade. In large part, the growth that spurred North Carolina to second in the nation for installed solar is thus far attributed to the rapid deployment of utility-scale solar installations. Customer-sited solar, meanwhile, has also continued to grow…

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NCUC Rules on Duke Energy Progress Rate Case: Takeaways for the Clean Energy Community

Last summer, Duke Energy Progress (DEP) filed an application to increase their retail rates with the NC Utilities Commission (NCUC). As advocates for clean energy, NCSEA pays close attention to any changes in utility rate structures; in particular, how the proposed changes impact access to energy efficiency and renewable energy options for customers. Accordingly, NCSEA…

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Keeping NC Open for Business: NCSEA, Fortune-500 Companies, Military & Universities Team Up to Improve Access to Renewable Energy

It’s well-known that countless influential business, healthcare, and education leaders have made a commitment to power their facilities with clean energy – many of them working toward a goal of 100% renewable energy usage in the near future. This movement has especially taken shape in the last several years, most notably as Fortune 100 and…

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PROPOSED Duke Solar Rebate Program Overview

The proposed Duke Energy Solar Rebate Program is currently under the review of the NC Utilities Commission. NCSEA will update our members as soon as we have a status update. In the meantime, please consider this plan a proposal and not yet a program. Click here to view details of the proposed plan. Background The…

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Advocating for NC’s Electric Consumers in the Duke Energy Progress Rate Case: Recap

As you know, NCSEA is actively engaged in both Duke Energy subsidiaries’ rate cases to pursue issues that matter to our members and further the best interests of North Carolina electric consumers through more clean energy options. (For a recap of the Duke subsidiaries’ rate increase requests, read more on our blog.) NCSEA’s regulatory team and our extended team of…

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NC Energy Storage Moves Beyond the Pilot Phase

In late September, Duke Energy announced that it would install two battery energy storage systems in Western North Carolina – a 9-megawatt lithium-ion battery in the City of Asheville and a 4-megawatt lithium-ion battery system in Madison County. These are the first battery storage projects for Duke Energy that are on a wide-scale, opening up…

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NCSEA Statement: ITC Suniva Ruling, Solar Tariff

Last week, the International Trade Commission (ITC) ruled in favor of Suniva and SolarWorld Americas that imported solar equipment has caused injury to the US solar industry. As a result, the ITC is expected to soon recommend to the White House a tariff on foreign-produced solar products. NCSEA is concerned by this decision, as we…

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Duke Energy Subsidiaries Request Rate Increases

Over the summer, both Duke subsidiaries operating in North Carolina filed applications to increase their retail rates with the North Carolina Utilities Commission. Duke Energy Progress, LLC (“DEP”) filed their application on June 1 in Docket No. E-2, Sub 1142, and Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC (“DEC”) filed theirs on August 25 in Docket No. E-7, Sub 1146. While the applications…

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NC General Assembly Issues RFP As Part of 18-Month Wind Energy Moratorium; Begins Unnecessary $150k Study

In late June, legislators passed a moratorium on permitting of wind energy projects in NC through Dec. 31, 2018   RALEIGH, NC – In the closing hours of the 2017 legislative session in late June, the NC General Assembly passed House Bill 589, The Competitive Energy Solutions Act for North Carolina, and it was signed into law by Gov. Roy Cooper…

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DOE Grid Study: A Missed Opportunity

This week, the Department of Energy released their much-anticipated study on grid resiliency and reliability. Unfortunately, the report follows a thesis that the reliable energy future we all want must still rely primarily on traditional, or “baseload”, forms of energy generation such as coal and nuclear. NCSEA shares the concerns of our partner organization, Advanced Energy Economy (AEE), that this…

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